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Union Miles: Part 1

  This was my first run of the Union Miles   neighborhood. It covered a portion that is historically known as Corlett  which is roughly E. 116 to E. 154th. It was named after  Harriet Corlett, a Manx (Isle of Man, Ireland) immigrant and Cleveland Public Schools principal. Map:   Run 1 , Run 2 , Run 3 Distance This Section: 16.3 miles Distance So Far: 764.9 miles These beautiful homes on E. 147th were some of the nicest in all of my running in this section. Many of them were built in the 1930s and have the same homeowners for decades. According book Surrogate Suburbs: Black Upward Mobility and Neighborhood Change in Cleveland , Jesse Owens once lived on this street as well. A little further south in the Lee Seville neighborhood, Ohio's first Black mayor's lived on E. 147th ( Author Johnson , whose house is a city landmark). That's a lot of notable Black history for one city street. Here's another nice set on E. 153rd. These were built between 1930 and 1942 and several of

Lee Seville: Part 2

  This was my second and final run of the  Lee Seville   neighborhood. Map:   Run 1 , Run 2 , Run 3 Distance This Section: 14.0 miles Distance So Far: 748.6 miles The Myrtle-Highview Historic District is the first historic district in Ward 1 to be named to the National Register of Historic Places. The district's solid group of mid-century modern brick homes are tucked away off Lee Road, lining Myrtle Avenue and Highview Road. These homes were built by Mr. Arthur Bussey, an African American bricklayer and building contractor who moved to Cleveland from Georgia after WWI. Bussey and his wife, Emma, rented in various parts of near east side and purchased their first home on E. 88th Street in Glenville. During this time, Arthur was a housing construction labor by day and took architectural drafting classes as night.  He served as general contractor in the rebuilding of Emmanuel Baptist Church after a fire destroyed it in 1939. Overcrowding in Cedar Central led many Black residents look